Conference on Disarmament

The Conference on Disarmament convenes every year in Geneva in 3 sessions from January to September. The successor to various Geneva-based arms control bodies dating back to the 1950s, the CD is regarded as an autonomous negotiating forum, although it has a close relationship with the United Nations. Its current role and rules of procedure derive from decisions taken by the First UN Special Session on Disarmament (SSOD I) in 1978. The CD presently has 65 member states;. many others participate as observers; agreement on new members requires consensus, which has not been possible since five additional states were admitted in 1999.

After concluding its negotiations on the...

The Conference on Disarmament convenes every year in Geneva in 3 sessions from January to September. The successor to various Geneva-based arms control bodies dating back to the 1950s, the CD is regarded as an autonomous negotiating forum, although it has a close relationship with the United Nations. Its current role and rules of procedure derive from decisions taken by the First UN Special Session on Disarmament (SSOD I) in 1978. The CD presently has 65 member states;. many others participate as observers; agreement on new members requires consensus, which has not been possible since five additional states were admitted in 1999.

After concluding its negotiations on the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) in 1992 and negotiating the CTBT from 1994-96, in March 1995, the CD adopted the ‘Shannon Mandate’ to negotiate a ban on the production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons (fissban/FM(C)T), but the CD’s inability to achieve a sustainable consensus on a programme of work since then has prevented negotiations getting underway. The CD inherited a 'decalogue' of 10 priorities from the First UN Special Session on Disarmament (UNSSOD I) in 1978, which is still regarded by some members as the basis of its work, although the programme of work has since been updated. Various initiatives have failed to gain consensus for a programme of work that would address four main identified issues: nuclear disarmament, FM(C)T, ‘prevention of an arms race in outer space’ (PAROS), and negative security assurances (NSA).

27 February 2014

A key multilateral disarmament body appears ready to renew an informal working group aimed at breaking a stalemate dating back to the 1990s.

Discussions at the international Conference on Disarmament in Geneva this week revealed "the common will" to have the informal...

15 May 2013

Iran on Tuesday defended its election as the rotating chair of the world's sole multilateral disarmament forum after the United States announced that its ambassador to the U.N. Conference on Disarmament would boycott any meeting led by Tehran.

The U.N....

9 April 2013

For years governments told us in meetings that an Arms Trade Treaty was a fanciful idea – merely a twinkle in our campaigning eye. But earlier this month...

22 April 2013

The Spring 2013 edition of Proliferation in Parliament offers a review of news, debates and developments in the UK Parliament and Government on issues relating to nuclear weapons, disarmament and proliferation.  It is published in mid-April 2013 as parliamentarians return...

15 January 2013

The Winter 2012-2013 edition of Proliferation in Parliament offers a review of news, debates and developments in the UK Parliament and Government on issues relating to nuclear weapons, disarmament and proliferation.  It is published in January 2013 following the Christmas...

Dr Rebecca Johnson
17 December 2014

Driven by “the imperative of human security for all", Austria pledged at the...

Dr Rebecca Johnson
14 March 2014

As the world looks on with trepidation at the growing crisis between Ukraine and Russia, does anyone think that the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States could play a constructive role?

Of course not.

At best they will be irrelevant. At worst—and many commentators...

Tim Caughley
2 December 2012
There are good reasons for the inclusion of the consensus rule in the Conference of Disarmament’s Rules of Procedure.  These are discussed below. ...
15 July 2013

Question asked by Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether Ambassador Jo Adamson, United Kingdom Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament, will be attending meetings of the United Nations Open-Ended Working Group on Taking Forward...

6 June 2013

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent progress has been made on negotiations on the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty. [158404]

Alistair Burt: The Government wants negotiations to start in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) on a...

22 May 2013

Lord Judd: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the likely outcome of the second session of the United Nations Conference on Disarmament; what are their objectives for the session; and what contribution they have made to the call for reports on the...

Author(s): UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
19 April 2012

I commend the United States for convening this follow-up meeting to the Security Council Summit chaired by President Obama in September 2009.

Many welcome developments have occurred since then.

The 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review...

Author(s): UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
24 January 2012

Delivered by Mr. Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

I welcome the opportunity to convey greetings to the Conference on Disarmament today.
This body has long served as the world’s single multilateral disarmament...

1 August 2009
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